forest scene - from shutterstockDawn chorus with two Wood Thrushes countersinging. 27 April 1995, Land Between the Lakes, Kentucky. ยฉ Lang Elliott. Please play at a low volume to simulate a natural listening experience.

Here is a lovely 6.5 minute soundscape that I just uncovered … two Wood Thrushes singing back-and-forth at dawn, recorded in hardwood forest at Land Between the Lakes Kentucky way back in 1995, about the time I began gathering binaural soundscapes. I rather like it and think it’s a powerful reminder of things to come (yep, SPRING is just around the corner, believe me!).

Wood Thrush portrait by Lang ElliottIt’s a busy dawn chorus for sure, but if played at a medium to low sound level, it’s fairly gentle on the ears. The recording also features the incessant singing of distant Whip-poor-wills, Barred Owls hooting, Mourning Doves cooing, a woodpecker drumming (probably a Hairy Woodpecker), and plenty more species for the discerning ear.

While it’s easy to capture dawn choruses in late spring and early summer, many end up being way too dense to be enjoyable beyond a minute or two of listening, Perhaps this one is an exception?

Let me know what you think! Where does this fit on the meditative versus engaging continuum?

On a sidenote, one of my readers (Jane Laberee) e-mailed me and asked if I’ve noticed declines in Wood Thrush numbers. I explained that I haven’t (at least in my favorite spots to record them), but admitted that my impression is not at all quantitative, not at all based on actual scientific data. The fact of the matter is that scientists have evidence that Wood Thrush populations have declined by more than 50% over the last fifty years, according to breeding bird survey data … probably due to loss of habitat on both their breeding and wintering grounds. Here are two relevant sources:

ABC Birds Article
Smithsonian Institution Article

Not at all good news, is it?

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