Okanagon Thrushscape

Baldy Mountain Landscape  by Lang Elliott

As most of you know, I gathered soundscapes throughout the American West last spring and summer. Toward the end of my trip, I traveled as far north as British Columbia, homing-in on the Okanagon Valley region. Recording was difficult due to breezy weather, but there was one calm morning and I managed to snag an excellent soundscape featuring three Swainson’s Thrushes singing in Subalpine Fir (Abies lasiocarpa) in the mountains to the east of Oliver, B.C.

Thunder Crickets

lightning scene - shutterstock_89026090

While digging through old recordings in search of those I think are suitable for relaxation, meditation and healing, I came across this jewel. I’m calling it “Thunder Crickets” and it portrays a thunderstorm passing near a shrubby meadow in late September, here in my homeland of upstate New York …

Porcupine Panderings

PORCUPINE shutterstock

Ever heard a Porcupine squeal in the dark of the night? Well, I heard and recorded a squealing porcupine long ago in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York, and that’s why I was able to identify the source of the mysterious sounds I captured just a few weeks ago in my beloved Shindagin Hollow. What a wonderful vocalization, so animated and full of emotion …

Coqui Magic Nightscapes

El Yunque Mountain Scene © Lang Elliott

Just for fun, I’ve been exploring my Coqui recordings from my trip to Puerto Rico in March of 2013. As many of you already know, the Puerto Rican or Common Coqui is a small tropical frog that is widespread throughout the island (along with a handful of other species in the genus), and that has a very recognizable breeding call that rises in pitch and sounds like a whistled CO-KEE! Featured are four amazing nighttime soundscapes that will give you a taste of what the tropical forest sounds like in the wee hours before dawn …

Catskill Beaver Pond

catskill beaver pond © Lang Elliott

Hi all! I’m fresh back from a workshop retreat with David Abram in the Catskills and I managed to get some interesting nighttime soundscapes at a nearby beaver pond complex. Featured are the howls and yips of Coyotes (Coy-Wolves?), the screams of a Barred Owl, and the chips of a Flying Squirrel. Pease check out this post, I think you’ll enjoy the show!

Crickets, Drip, Owls and Peepers

beaver pond in Shindagin Hollow, at dusk © Lang Elliott

Tomorrow, I’m off to the Catskills to attend a workshop with David Abram, author of the splendid book “Spell of the Sensuous.” Should be fun. But to keep y’all happy while I’m gone, I’ve decided to post a new immersive binaural (3D) soundscape … I’m calling it “Crickets, Drip, Owls and Peepers” and I recorded it on the 25th of September 2017 in nearby Shindagin Hollow. How fortunate I am to have captured this wonderful recording!

The Clucking Munks

Eastern Chipmunk with pouches full

Now is the time of year when the woods are alive with chipmunks, busying themselves collecting beechnuts and acorns to cache in their burrows for the coming winter. Now is also a productive season for forest hawks, hoping to swoop down and snatch-up unwary chipmunks that are pre-occupied with gathering food. But what is most interesting for us nature-listeners is that chipmunks respond to hawk fly-bys with a special “aerial predator alarm call” … a hollow, resonant cluck … cluck … cluck … cluck … cluck … that is unmistakable. It sounds like this …

Light Rain and Blue Jays

Shindagin Hollow forest scene

Featuring light rain and the calls of blue jays and spring peepers, this remarkably immersive binaural field recording is best appreciated by listening over headphones. The raindrops provide a wide, relaxing soundstage against which blue jays sound off with a variety of nasal sounds and jay-calls. Occasionally spring peepers give brief series’ of bird-like peeps … their “autumn piping” from trees and shrubs, often occurring quite far from their breeding pools and ponds.

Desert Sojourn – Podcast

Desert Sojourn is a 25-minute podcast featuring binaural nature recordings that I gathered in Organ Pipe National Monument in southern Arizona … 300,000 acres of prime Sonoran Desert habitat, a veritable wonderland for nature lovers and sound recordists such as myself.

Las Cienegas National Conservation Area

Las Cienegas National Conservation Area © Lang Elliott

IN EARLY TO MID APRIL, I made two visits to Las Cienegas National Conservation Area (altitude 4600 feet), located about eight miles north of Sonoita, Arizona. Located in the transitional area between the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts, the picturesque refuge comprises more than 42,000 acres of rolling grasslands with numerous riparian corridors lined with tall cottonwood trees. I had very good luck recording there …

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