2017 Soundscape Recording Expedition

Lang selfieIn early March of 2017, I will embark on a 6-month recording expedition to western destinations. Fans will be able to track my journey via my online Nature Sound Map, which will feature recordings accessible via markers on the map. I will also produce Podcasts and Blog Posts, and regularly publish to Facebook and SoundCloud, thus allowing for multiple ways to access my recordings and supportive materials.

My trip will take me to the Southwest, the Great Basin, the Rocky Mountains, the Sierras, coastal California and Oregon, and the Northwest, with multiple loops and side excursions, perhaps even to the Dakotas and nearby Canadian locations.

Goals: My primary goal is to collect and share a steady stream of spacious and immersive nature soundscape recordings, with emphasis on the voices of our native birds, frogs, insects and mammals … along with earth sounds such as thunder and rain, wind and waves. My approach is rooted in the spirit of communion and celebration, with the goal of encouraging a deep and profound listening experience.

I will also be collecting and sharing closeup recordings of various species, along with supportive photographs and videos. In addition, I will be providing personal details about my journey through my podcast and blog, along with regular postings on social media sites.

Please Donate: I am self-financing my expedition and it doubtful that I will ever be able to recoup my expenses through the sale of the recordings themselves (see more detailed discussion at Support My Giving). My desire is to share my recordings and experiences freely on a variety of platforms, in order to maximize their impact on the world at large. For this reason, I am asking for your support:

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT MY JOURNEY

My Nature Sound Map: A key component of my expedition will be to share recordings via an online Nature Sound Map that will allow followers to access nature recordings by location by clicking on pins on a map. I have developed a working prototype and will officially launch my map in early March, shortly after I embark on my expedition.

What is a “Soundscape”? A natural soundscape is a recorded impression of the totality of sound heard at a particular location. This can be contrasted with a closeup recording of a particular sound event … such as a singing bird …that has been lifted from the full array of sound. As such, natural soundscapes can be compared to panoramic landscape photographs that offer a broad and inclusive view of a particular place at a particular time.

My Soundscape Recording Technique: While I use a variety of microphone techniques depending on the situation, my mainstay is a special “binaural” setup that simulates the human head (go here for more information). The resulting recordings have extraordinary spatial depth, especially when listened-to using earbuds or headphones. This will have a strong impact on anyone who listens using earbuds via their mobile device (smartphone or tablet) … listeners may actually think they are on-location outdoors, fully immersed in the natural world. What could be better than that?

My Podcast Series: My podcast (which will be available via iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play and other podcast distribution channels) will be central to my sharing effort. I will officially launch it in early March as I embark on my expedition. In essence, it will be a series of “audio postcards” that document the progress of my journey, allowing listeners to join in the excitement as I explore America’s wild places in search of pristine recording locations.

My Blog: I already have an active blog where I’ve been sharing recordings, my experiences in the field, and promoting discussion. As my expedition unfolds, my blog posts will provide backup information for each podcast (photos, range maps, text, etc.), and will also feature the best pure-nature soundscapes (without narration) that I collect along the way (note that these same recordings will be mirrored on Soundcloud, allowing for easy access via their popular platform).

1 Comment

  1. Elaine

    A suggestion: what about trumpeter swans? They migrate through Montana I believe. Can you record their music?

    Reply

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